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Doctor Who, began in 1963 with William Hartnell playing the role. Over one million charachters have died. Learn about all the doctors below, and to see all the episodes click here.


The First Doctor (1963 - 66)Edit

Played by William Hartnell, he was the Doctor for the first three and a bit seasons, before handing the role to Patrick Troughton.

He played an old, grumpy Doctor who didn't trust his companions

The Second Doctor (1966-69)Edit

Taking over the role, Patrick Troughton performed as a slightly younger, slightly odder Doctor who had many fun adventures with his companions. He was very silly and childlike , but could get extremely angry .

The Third Doctor (1970-74)Edit

Jon Pertwee became a Doctor, exiled to Earth by his people. He worked alongside U.N.I.T whilst tryig to fix his TARDIS. He finally managed it, but soon regenerated...

The Fourth Doctor (1974-81)Edit

Tom Baker has played the Doctor for the longest amount time...so far. A brilliant adventurer, known to be fond of Jelly babies. So much so, that the running joke is an iconic part of fans Doctor Who history, as is Tom Baker's Doctor.

The Fifth Doctor (1982-84)Edit

The Fifth Doctor was played by Peter Davison, who for over 25 years was youngest actor ever to pay him, of course replaced by Matt Smith. Dressed for cricket with a stick of celery, this Doctor was very adventurous. he regenerated on the planet Androzani.

The Sixth Doctor (1984-86)Edit

An arrogant Doctor, played by Colin Baker, was perfectly original to keep the series continuing. All though he only had a short time, he brought something new to the Doctor, a did the next Doctor.

The Seventh Doctor (1987-89,1996)Edit

Played by Sylvester McCoy, the Seventh Doctor was comical but also just as brave as all past Doctor's. Sadly, it was during his time that Doctor Who was put on hold.

The Eighth Doctor (1996)Edit

Played by Paul McGann, he starred ina short TV movie which showed him as a new timelord who went to have lots of adventures in audios, comics and books.

The Ninth Doctor (2005)Edit

For just one series, Christopher Eccleston appeared as a very depressed Doctor who had lost his people in a huge war with his enemy. He brought the show back, but left quickly and someone else took the role.

The Tenth Doctor (2005-10)Edit

One of the most popular Doctor's, David Tennant played the role as a fun, fast and fantastic Doctor. Playing the character for three series and and a load of specials, all Whofans were upset when he backed out.

The Eleventh Doctor (2010-13)Edit

Matt Smith has brought something new to the role, and still amazes fans as the Doctor.

unmade storiesEdit

First Doctor

[edit] Submitted for series 1Edit

[edit] Nothing at the End of the Lane/The GiantsEdit

The first serial of the series was originally to be written by C. E. Webber,[1][2][3] and would concern the four main characters (at that point named as the Doctor, Cliff, Lola, and Biddy) being shrunk to a "miniature size" and attacked by giant animals. The episode would have revealed that the Doctor had escaped from "his own galaxy" in the year 5733, seeking a perfect society in the past, and that he was pursued by agents from his own time who sought to prevent him from stopping their society from coming into being.[4] The story was rejected in June 1963 on the grounds that the story was too thin on characterisation and that the giant monsters would be clichéd and too expensive to produce. Much of the setup was retained for An Unearthly Child, though the details about the Doctor's home were removed. The story's premise was reused for a submission by Robert Gould (later revised by Margot Bennett), The Miniscules, which was planned to be the fourth serial, but this story was dropped in January 1964.[5] The third attempt to use a miniaturisation story was accepted for the Series 2 opener, Planet of Giants.[6]

[edit] The Masters of LuxorEdit

The Masters of Luxor was a six-part story submitted by Anthony Coburn for Series 1, but never produced, in which the Doctor faces a self-aware robot which is trying to gain a soul. It was rejected by the production team in mid-September 1963 in favour of Terry Nation's first Dalek serial.[7] Titan Books published the unused scripts in August 1992.[8][9] Edited by John McElroy, it was the fifth in the series of Doctor Who script books, and the first to appear after a break in publication following The Daleks (December 1989), during which the rights to the stories were negotiated with BBC Enterprises.[10] The text of Coburn's script was amended to fit in with accepted conventions - for example, consistent use of the name "Susan", rather than the "Suzanne" and "Sue" used by Coburn.[11] Major differences in style between these scripts and the transmitted series include a religious subtext, with the Doctor clearly presented as a believer.[9] It was later adapted by Nigel Robinson for Big Finish's The Lost Stories in August 2012.

[edit] Farewell Great MacedonEdit

Farewell Great Macedon (also known as Alexander the Great in the script's early stages) was a six-part story pitched for Series 1 and was written by Moris Farhi. In the story, the Doctor and his companions are framed for murder as part of a conspiracy to kill Alexander the Great and must pass a number of trials, including walking on hot coals, to gain the trust of his bodyguard Ptolemy.[12][13] The script was published by Nothing at the End of the Lane in October 2009.[14] It was later adapted by Nigel Robinson for Big Finish's The Lost Stories range in November 2010.

[edit] The Fragile Yellow Arc of FragranceEdit

The Fragile Yellow Arc of Fragrance was the first script sent by Moris Farhi. It was one episode long and was a calling card piece never seriously pitched for production. This story never made it to the production stage, and was included in the 2009 publication of Farhi's script for Farewell Great Macedon.[14] It was later adapted by Nigel Robinson for Big Finish's The Lost Stories range in November 2010.

[edit] The Hidden PlanetEdit

The Hidden Planet by Malcolm Hulke was commissioned in December 1963 and at one point was to be the seventh serial of Series 1.[1][15] The story would have concerned a planet in an orbit opposite Earth's, with a parallel but in some ways opposite society to ours; for example, women were to be the dominant sex. The original script was sent back for rewrites, and due to a pay dispute the rewrites were not made until after Susan had left the series; this necessitated further rewriting. A third submission was similarly rejected as Ian and Barbara were due to leave, and the script was dropped.[1]

[edit] The Living WorldEdit

Alan Wakeman was one of several writers contacted by David Whitaker in mid-1963.[16]

[edit] The Red FortEdit

Commissioned in September 1963, Terry Nation had intended for his second seven-part serial to be set during the British Raj in India (probably to have been the eighth serial), but the story was ultimately abandoned as the Daleks became a success, and demand for further adventures grew.[15][17]

[edit] Submitted for series 2Edit

[edit] Britain 408 ADEdit

Written by Malcolm Hulke.[18]

[edit] The Dark PlanetEdit

Written by Brian Hayles.[19] It was later adapted by Matt Fitton for Big Finish's The Lost Stories range in September 2013.

[edit] Submitted for series 3Edit

[edit] The Face of GodEdit

Written by John Wiles.[20]

[edit] The Hands of AtenEdit

Written by Brian Hayles.[21]

[edit] The New ArmadaEdit

Written by David Whitaker.[22]

[edit] The White WitchEdit

Written by Brian Hayles.[21]

[edit] "Untitled storyline (Lucarotti)"Edit

Written by John Lucarotti[5] and was planned to be about the 1857 Indian Mutiny.[citation needed]

[edit] "Untitled storyline (Lucarotti 2)"Edit

Written by John Lucarotti[5] and was planned to be about Leif Eriksson.[citation needed]

[edit] Submitted for series 4Edit

[edit] The ClockEdit

Written by David Ellis.[23]

[edit] The Evil EyeEdit

Written by Geoffrey Orme,[24] this story was rejected in August 1966.[25]

[edit] The Hearsay MachineEdit

Written by George Kerr.[24]

[edit] The Heavy Scent of ViolenceEdit

Written by George Kerr.[24]

[edit] The Herdsmen of AquariusEdit

Written by Donald Cotton,[24] and also known as The Herdsmen of Venus,[25] this story would involve the Loch Ness Monster[25] and was under consideration in early August 1966.[25]

[edit] The Hounds of TimeEdit

Written by Brian Hayles.[26]

[edit] The Man from the MetEdit

Written by George Kerr.[24]

[edit] The NazisEdit

Written by Brian Hayles.[27]

[edit] The Ocean LinerEdit

Written by David Ellis.[23]

[edit] The People Who Couldn't RememberEdit

Written by David Ellis & Malcolm Hulke.[23]

[edit] Other First Doctor storiesEdit

  • The Son of Doctor Who, a story idea originated by William Hartnell[17]
  • "Untitled American Civil War storyline", by unknown author
  • "Untitled Egyptian storyline", by Dennis Spooner
  • "Untitled The Day of the Triffids-like storyline", by Robert Gould[5]

[edit] Second DoctorEdit

[edit] Submitted for series 4Edit

[edit] The AntsEdit

Written by Roger Dixon, this story was submitted in early 1967.[28]

[edit] Bar KochbarEdit

Written by Roger Dixon, this story was submitted in early 1967.[28]

[edit] The Big StoreEdit

Written by David Ellis & Malcolm Hulke, this story was submitted on 15 November 1966[29] and would involve faceless aliens infiltrating department stores as display mannequins.[29] Ellis & Hulke would reuse the faceless aliens for their successful script submission The Faceless Ones.[28]

[edit] The ImpsEdit

Planned as the fourth serial of Series 4,[30] The Imps by William Emms was a four-part story[30] concerned about a spaceship overrun by Imp-like aliens and aggressive alien vegetation.[30] The script was commissioned on 17 October 1966,[30] and soon had to be rewritten to accommodate new companion Jamie.[29] However, due to sickness on the part of Emms,[29] this took so long that further rewrites were needed to explain the loss of Ben and Polly[28] and on 4 January 1967 the story was dropped.[28] Emms reused elements of the story in Mission to Venus, a Choose Your Own Adventure-style story featuring the Sixth Doctor.[1]

[edit] The King's Bedtime StoryEdit

Written by Roger Dixon, this story was submitted in early 1967.[28]

[edit] The MutantEdit

Written by Barry Letts, this story outline, submitted around November 1966,[29] would involve a race of beings undergoing a cycle of mutations.[29] Letts would later, as producer, have writers Bob Baker & Dave Martin use this as the basis of their script The Mutants.

[edit] The New MachinesEdit

Written by Roger Dixon, this story was submitted in early 1967.[28]

[edit] The Return of the NeanderthalEdit

Written by Roger Dixon, this storyline was about the TARDIS being dragged beneath the sands of Terunda[28] to encounter people descended from Earth's Neanderthal Man who wish to return to the Earth of 2016.[28] These story elements are similar to the story arc of the Silurians, who dwell underground and wish to one day return to the surface.

[edit] The SleepwalkersEdit

Written by Roger Dixon, this six-part story[28] was submitted on 16 January 1967.[28] The story involved the TARDIS crew arriving on an Earth of the far future where a community of youth depend on the unseen Elders who dwell in the mountains.[28]

[edit] Twin WorldEdit

Written by Roger Dixon, this story was submitted in early 1967.[28]

[edit] "Untitled storyline (Dixon)"Edit

Written by Roger Dixon, this story was submitted in early 1967[28] and is reported to have dealt with a world missing one fundamental aspect.[5]

[edit] "Untitled storyline (Letts)"Edit

Written by Barry Letts, this story, submitted around November 1966,[29] was about a sinister organisation operating on Earth under cover of an amusement park.[29] Letts later partly reused this idea as the radio adventure The Paradise of Death.

[edit] Submitted for series 5Edit

[edit] Operation WerewolfEdit

Written by Douglas Camfield & Robert Kitts, the storyline for this six-part story[31] was submitted to the production office on 18 September 1967,[31] although Camfield & Kitts had developed the outline in 1965.[31] The story saw the Doctor arrive in Normandy just prior to the D-Day landings.[31] It would feature a plan to stop the Nazis from using a form of matter teleportation.[31] Only a draft script for episode 1 would be written.[32]

[edit] The Queen of TimeEdit

Written by Brian Hayles.[33] It was later adapted by Catherine Harvey for Big Finish's The Lost Stories range in October 2013.

[edit] Submitted for series 6Edit

[edit] The Aliens in the BloodEdit

Written by Robert Holmes, this story was pitched on 22 October 1968.[34] The story was set in the 22nd Century and dealt with an outbreak of mutants with ESP powers.[34] The plot was reused by Holmes in 1977 as the non-Doctor Who radio serial Aliens in the Mind.[citation needed]

[edit] The DreamspinnerEdit

Written by Paul Wheeler, this four-part story[35] was commissioned as a scene breakdown on 23 February 1968.[35]

[edit] The Eye in SpaceEdit

Written by Victor Pemberton.[12]

[edit] The HarvestersEdit

Written by William Emms and also known as The Vampire Planet.[1]

[edit] The ImpersonatorsEdit

Written by Malcolm Hulke, this six-part story was commissioned on 5 July 1968.[36] The serial was cancelled on 30 December 1968[37] and its production budget allocated to The War Games, allowing that story to be expanded to 10 episodes.[34]

[edit] The Laird of McCrimmonEdit

Written by Mervyn Haisman & Henry Lincoln, this storyline was considered around mid-1968.[36] The story would be set in Scotland in Jamie's ancestral home, Castle McCrimmon, where The Great Intelligence plans to use Jamie's body.[36] At the end of the story Jamie would remain behind as the new laird.[36]

[edit] The Lords of the Red PlanetEdit

Written by Brian Hayles, this storyline was dropped around May 1968.[38] It was later adapted by John Dorney for Big Finish's The Lost Stories range in November 2013.

[edit] The Prison in SpaceEdit

The Prison in Space by Dick Sharples, originally titled The Amazons,[36] returned to the idea of a female-dominated planet[39][40] last attempted with The Hidden Planet. The Doctor and Jamie were to be imprisoned, and Zoe was to start a sexual revolution and then be brainwashed.[citation needed] The four-part story[36] was commissioned on 4 June 1968[36] and was intended to inject humour into the show.[citation needed] It was to feature Jamie in drag and end with the Doctor deprogramming Zoe by smacking her bottom.[citation needed] The serial was rewritten to accommodate Frazer Hines' desire to leave by introducing a new companion named Nik,[36] and again when he later decided to stay. Scripts for the first two episodes were delivered on 27 August 1968.[36] The production team became unhappy with the serial, and when Sharples refused to perform further rewrites, the serial was dropped.[41] The story was replaced by The Krotons.[41] It was later adapted as Prison in Space by Simon Guerrier for Big Finish's The Lost Stories series in December 2010. In 2011, an illustrated scriptbook was released by Nothing at the End of the Lane.

[edit] The RosemarinersEdit

Beginning life as The Rosacrutians,[42] this story by Donald Tosh came about after Tosh contacted the production staff in early 1968 to see if they would be interested in him pitching a script.[43] Initial discussion saw the story begin as a story featuring Jamie and Victoria,[43] but by the time Tosh delivered the first materials for the story Patrick Troughton had already decided to depart the series.[43] At this point it was turned down by the production team[42] Tosh had completed a script for the first episode and notes for the subsequent three episodes.[42] Tosh completed a full storyline for DWM in 1994.[42][43] Set on an Earth Space station it deals with a conflict between the staff of the station and the Rosemariners,[43] a group who plan to hold the staff hostage in return for Earth supplying them with sophisticated weapons.[42] It was later adapted by Tosh for Big Finish's The Lost Stories range in September 2012.

[edit] The Stones of DarknessEdit

Written by Brian Hayles.[44]

[edit] "Untitled storyline (Ling)"Edit

Written by Peter Ling, this involved a story in which time runs backwards.[5]

[edit] "Untitled storyline (Sherwin)"Edit

Written by Derrick Sherwin.[5]

[edit] Third DoctorEdit

[edit] Submitted for series 7Edit

[edit] The Circles of PowerEdit

Written by Brian Hayles.[45]

[edit] The Mists of MadnessEdit

Written by Brian Wright.[46]

[edit] The Shadow PeopleEdit

Written by Charlotte & Dennis Plimmer,[46] this seven-part story[17] was submitted to the production office 10 November 1969.[17] It was seriously considered as the final story of Series 7,[17] but a pay dispute with the writers saw the story being dropped.[17]

[edit] "Untitled storyline (Ray)"Edit

Written by Trevor Ray, this story would have been set underwater.[5]

[edit] Submitted for series 8Edit

[edit] The CerebroidsEdit

Written by Brian Wright, this story was commissioned on 24 June 1970[12] before being abruptly dropped on 29 June 1970.[12]

[edit] The Space WarEdit

Written by Ian Stuart Black[47] and also known as The Furies,[17] this six-part story[17] was commissioned on 9 November 1969.[17]

[edit] The Hollow MenEdit

Written by Brian Hayles.[48]

[edit] The Spare-Part PeopleEdit

Written by Jon Pertwee & Reed de Rouen[17] and also known as The Brain Drain and The Labyrinth,[17] this seven-part story[17] was submitted to the production team in the summer of 1970.[17] In the proposed storyline the Doctor poses as a Cambridge don to investigate a series of disappearances.[17] He himself is kidnapped and taken to a civilization under Antarctica.[17]

[edit] "Untitled storyline (Camfield)"Edit

Written by Douglas Camfield, this story involved a hidden Amazon city[5] and was submitted in late 1970.[5]

[edit] "Untitled storyline (Worth)"Edit

Written by Martin Worth, this story would involve plant life trying to take over the Earth.[5]

[edit] Submitted for series 9Edit

[edit] The Brain-DeadEdit

Written by Brian Hayles,[47] this was submitted to the production office during the spring of 1971.[12] The story involved an Ice Warrior plan to invade the Earth[12] using a 'Z' beam which freezes things it strikes to absolute zero.[12] When used on humans it turns them into zombie-like slaves.[12] Script editor Dicks rejected the storyline, but the inclusion of the Ice Warriors inspired the development of The Curse of Peladon.[12]

[edit] The Daleks in LondonEdit

The Daleks in London, commissioned on 25 May 1971,[12] was to be the final story of Series 9 in 1972,[12] re-introducing the Daleks after a five year absence. Little is known about the exact storyline of the six-part[12] Robert Sloman serial, other than the fact that it would have had some similarities to The Dalek Invasion of Earth, except set in contemporary London.[49] This similarity caused the production team some concern,[citation needed] and producer Barry Letts eventually decided that he would rather start the series with a Dalek adventure instead of ending it with one.[citation needed] An unrelated submission by Louis Marks was therefore rewritten into Day of the Daleks, and The Time Monster was commissioned to replace the original series finale.[12]

[edit] The MegaEdit

Written by Bill Strutton,[47] this four-part story[12] was submitted to the production office on 25 September 1970[50] It was later adapted by Simon Guerrier for Big Finish's The Lost Stories range in December 2013.

[edit] The Shape of TerrorEdit

Written by Brian Hayles,[47] this story was submitted during the spring of 1971.[17]

[edit] Submitted for series 10Edit

[edit] MultifaceEdit

Written by Godfrey Harrison,[51] this four-part story[50] was commissioned by Letts on 19 July 1971.[50] Feeling it was more fantastical than appropriate for Doctor Who,[50] Letts dropped the story on 25 February 1972.[50]

[edit] Submitted for series 11Edit

[edit] The AutomataEdit

Written by Robert Holmes,[52] this four-part story[12] was commissioned on 16 January 1973.[12] Letts and Dicks didn't like the storyline[12] and it was replaced by The Time Warrior.[12]

[edit] The Final GameEdit

The Third Doctor's final story was to be The Final Game by Robert Sloman[12] and Barry Letts as an uncredited co-writer[12] which was commissioned on 15 February 1973.[12] The story was to end with the Master dying in a manner which suggested that he was trying to save the Doctor's life.[12] The actor who played the Master, Roger Delgado, was killed in a car accident in Turkey on 18 June 1973,[12] forcing the scrapping of the story.[12] The story was replaced by Planet of the Spiders.[12]

[edit] Fourth DoctorEdit

[edit] Submitted for series 12Edit

[edit] The Ark in SpaceEdit

Written by John Lucarotti, this script came about after Space Station (see below) was rejected[53] and Lucarotti was suggested by Terrance Dicks as a replacement writer on the strength of his Moonbase 3 script.[53] The story would use the same space station setting as Space Station,[54] the setting being dictated by the production office as means of saving money by having it share sets with Revenge of the Cybermen.[54] The story would deal with an infestation of the space station by alien spores.[54] It was replaced by a new The Ark in Space by Robert Holmes, which shared only the setting with the previous version.[54]

[edit] The Sea of FearEdit

Written by Brian Hayles submitted this storyline to the production office on 9 March 1974.[55] The story involves the Doctor and Sarah becoming caught up in an experiment to determine the true ancestors of humankind.[55]

[edit] Space StationEdit

Written by Christopher Langley,[54] this storyline for a four-part story[17] was submitted to the production office on 30 December 1973.[12] It was subsequently commissioned for scripts on 24 January 1974[17] and planned as the second story of Series 12.[17] It was dropped on 17 June 1974[17] and replaced by Lucarotti's The Ark in Space.[53]

[edit] "Untitled storyline (Adams)"Edit

Written by Douglas Adams, this story was submitted around the middle of 1974.[5] It involved a space ship leaving Earth and filled with the affluent but "useless" members of society.[5] Adams later adapted the material for the "B Ark" storyline of The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy.[5]

[edit] Submitted for series 13Edit

[edit] The AngarathEdit

Written by Eric Pringle, the story dealt with people offering sacrifices to sentient rocks.[12] Pringle was commissioned on 11 August 1975 by producer Philip Hinchcliffe[56] to write the first two episodes of the four-part story.[56] Pringle submitted the final two episodes without commission on 10 March 1976,[57] but the story was cancelled on 23 June 1976.[57]

[edit] The Beasts of ManzicEdit

Written by Robin Smyth, this six-part story[56] was rejected on 13 May 1975.[56]

[edit] The Eyes of NemesisEdit

Written by Brian Hayles, this story was submitted to the production office on 15 May 1975.[58] It would involve the Doctor and Sarah in a chase between the hunter Torr and his quarry Lakdem.[58] Towards the end of the adventure it is revealed that Torr works for the Celestial Toymaker.[59]

[edit] Fires of the StarmindEdit

Written by Marc Platt, this story was submitted in late 1975[12] and dealt with a sentient star using the Time Lord libraries as a means of invading Gallifrey.[12] It was rejected on 15 December 1975.[12]

[edit] The HauntingEdit

Written by Terrance Dicks,[60] this six-part story[61] was submitted at the start of November 1974[53] and was to dealt with vampires.[1] The storyline was commissioned on 11 December 1974,[1] but was abandoned on 13 May 1975.[56] Dicks later reused some of the material for his 1977 script The Vampire Mutation,[1] the story that eventually became State of Decay.[1]

[edit] The Menday FaultEdit

Written by David Wiltshire, this was an unsolicited script[62] for a six-part story.[62] The story revolved around a nuclear submarine diving into the 'Fault of Menday' and discovering a subterranean world.[63] The 'sun' for this world is dying and the underground dwellers, Suranians led by Zorr, are planning to invade the surface world.[63] Wiltshire was never commissioned to develop the storyline further.[63]

[edit] The Nightmare PlanetEdit

Written by Dennis Spooner, this story was to be concerned with a planet where drugs in the food and water are used to control the populace.[50] Punishment would be meted out by temporary withdrawal from the drugs which would cause people to see monsters all around them.[50] The storyline for the four-part story[61] was commissioned on 31 January 1975[61] and the full scripts on 4 February 1975.[50]

[edit] The Prisoner of TimeEdit

Written by Barry Letts,[60] the storyline for this four-part story[61] was commissioned on 21 January 1975.[61] It was based on audition piece for the role of Sarah Jane Smith Letts had written in 1973[61] and was initially known as Time Lord Story.[61] Scripts were requested,[50] but Hinchcliffe was unhappy with the draft of the first part[50] and ultimately the story was dropped.[50]

[edit] Pyramids of MarsEdit

Written by Lewis Griefer, this story was commissioned in the July of 1974.[53] The story would involve museum keepers being chased out of the British Museum by a mummy.[64] It would turn out that a group was scaring people away in order to gain access to a sarcophagus which would contain wild rice from thousands of years ago.[65] The group wanted to use the rice to seed Mars and make a fortune.[65] It was replaced by Robert Holmes' Pyramids of Mars when Griefer fell ill[53] and the scripts came in late[65] and were not what the production team wanted.[65]

[edit] Return to SukannanEdit

Written by Terry Nation, this story was commissioned for a storyline on 13 February 1975.[61] It was replaced by The Android Invasion.[17]

[edit] The Silent ScreamEdit

Written by Chris Boucher, this story was an unsolicited submission sent to the production office in early 1975.[17]

[edit] Submitted for series 14Edit

[edit] The Dreamers of PhadosEdit

Written by Chris Boucher,[66] was submitted at some point after The Silent Scream had been rejected in early 1975.[12] It was based on a premise that Hinchcliffe and Holmes wanted to use in which people and machines are controlled by a computer that malfunctions.[67] It was to be set on a space ship which has been home to several generations of a civilization.[50]

[edit] The Foe from the FutureEdit

Written by Robert Banks Stewart as a six-part story,[68] the story was commissioned in May 1976.[57] This story was replaced by The Talons of Weng-Chiang,[69] which used the same basic premise of a villain traveling back in time[70] when Stewart took up the post of script editor on the series Armchair Thriller and would be unable to deliver the scripts.[68] It was later adapted by John Dorney for Big Finish's The Lost Stories range in January 2012.

[edit] The Gaslight MurdersEdit

Written by Basil Dawson,[70] this four-part story[1] involving murders in Victorian London[1] was planned to introduce a new companion following the departure of Sarah Jane Smith.[1] It was replaced by The Face of Evil.[1]

[edit] The Lost LegionEdit

Written by Douglas Camfield, this four-part story[71] was commissioned on 22 January 1976.[71] The story would involve the Doctor and Sarah arriving in North Africa at an isolated French Legion outpost.[71] This has become the battleground for a fight between two alien races, the Skarkel and Khoorians.[71] The story was planned to write out the character of Sarah and would see Sarah killed by one of the aliens.[71] The first script was submitted on 9 February 1976[1] and removed from the series schedule in April 1976.[57] Camfield would continue to work on the scripts, delivering the final part on 24 September 1976,[68] but the production team were no longer interested in pursuing the story.[1]

[edit] The Mentor ConspiracyEdit

Written by Chris Boucher,[66] this story was, like The Dreamer of Phados,[67] written to an idea brief from Holmes and Hinchcliffe.[67] It was to be set on a space ship which has been home to several generations of a civilization.[50] The script was turned down on 30 October 1975.[72]

[edit] Submitted for series 15Edit

[edit] The DividedEdit

Written by Moris Farhi, this four-part story[73] was officially commissioned by producer Graham Williams[73] on 8 November 1977.[73] The script was not produced and Farhi no longer recalls what it was about; the script itself is lost.[73]

[edit] Killers of the DarkEdit

Following the successful realisation of the Doctor's home planet of Gallifrey on screen in The Deadly Assassin, producer Graham Williams wanted another Gallifrey story.[citation needed] Script editor Anthony Read approached David Weir with whom he had worked before.[74] Weir's script, a six-part story, was planned as the final story of Series 15[69] and was commissioned on 18 July 1977.[1] Weir's script had elements drawn from Asian cultures,[69] and included a race of cat-people with links to Gallifrey.[69] Scenes included a gladiatorial duel in a stadium filled with cat-people.[1] Read and director Gerald Blake, upon reading the finished script, determined that the story would be impossible to shoot on Doctor Who's budget[1] and the story was abandoned mid-August 1977.[75] With only two weeks to spare before filming, Read and Williams quickly co-wrote a replacement script in the form of The Invasion of Time.[74] When asked about Weir's story at a fan convention years later, Williams could not recall its title and made up the name The Killer Cats of Geng Singh, by which title the story became widely known in fan circles.[1]

[edit] "Untitled storyline (Holmes)"Edit

Written by Robert Holmes, this storyline was considered in the autumn of 1976 when it was assumed Hinchcliffe would still be producing Series 15.[5] It was to have been inspired by Joseph Conrad's novel Heart of Darkness.[5]

[edit] Submitted for series 16Edit

[edit] The Lords of MisruleEdit

Written by Ted Willis[76] the four-part story[1] involved a hunt for a segment of the Key to Time disguised as a valuable jewel.[76] Set on the planet Tetran[77] the Doctor and Romana discover a populace ruled over by three oppressive Lords[77] who control things from their castle in orbit about the planet.[78]

[edit] Shield of ZarakEdit

Written by Ted Lewis,[79] and also known as Shield of Zareg[80] and The Doppelgängers,[81] the scripts for the first two episodes of the four-part fourth serial of the season[82] were delivered to the production office on 28 April 1978.[82] Although a third script arrived on 12 May 1978,[82] Lewis turning up inebriated to a meeting with Graham Williams and Anthony Read[82] and the unsuitability of the submitted material[82] meant the story was dropped and replaced by David Fisher's The Androids of Tara.[82]

[edit] "Untitled storyline (Boucher)"Edit

Written by Chris Boucher, this idea was submitted shortly after Boucher had completed Image of the Fendahl.[5] However, BBC Head of Drama Ronnie Marsh did not want writers working on both Doctor Who and Blake's 7 at the same time,[5] and the story was consequently dropped.[5]

[edit] ShadaEdit

Main article: ShadaShada was a six-part serial written by Douglas Adams that was to have concluded Series 17 in 1980.[83] Production was halted during filming due to a strike and never resumed,[84] although a reconstruction of the serial using narration and existing footage was later released on VHS in 1992. The story was later adapted by Big Finish in 2003 as a webcast production featuring Paul McGann's Eighth Doctor (and later released as an audio story that same year), while Adams himself reused elements from the serial for his first Dirk Gently novel Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency.[85] The story was novelized by Gareth Roberts in 2012.

[edit] Submitted for series 17Edit

[edit] Child ProdigyEdit

Written by Alistair Beaton & Sarah Dunant, this four-part story[86] was commissioned on 12 December 1978.[86] The scripts were delivered on 5 January 1979[86] and rejected four days later as unacceptable.[86]

[edit] The Doomsday ContractEdit

For Series 17, John Lloyd, a frequent collaborator with script editor Douglas Adams, adapted material from his unpublished science fiction story GiGax[87] and in October 1978[citation needed] submitted Shylock, a four-part serial written in Adams' light-hearted style.[80] After providing a second draft of the storyline to modify parts of the script to avoid issues such as the rules involving child actors,[87] Lloyd was forced to focus on his commitments as producer of Not the Nine O'Clock News.[88] Williams was still interested enough in the storyline that he made plans to involved writer Allan Prior to work on the scripts.[88] The storyline was commissioned on 7 February 1979[89] and a script list dated 29 June 1979 links Lloyd and Prior to the project.[88] Lloyd officially agreed to another writer taking on his story on 25 August 1979.[90] In the story, the Doctor subpoenaed to appear in court when a corporation tries to buy Earth in order to obtain a matter-transmutation device.[91]

[edit] ErinellaEdit

Written by Pennant Roberts, this four-part story[12] was commissioned on 10 January 1979 as Dragons of Fear.[89] The adventure would involve the planet Erinella[86] and two men fighting over a princess.[86] The Doctor would become involved in his own timeline[80] by arriving at the wrong time[80] and becoming accused of being a poisoner.[80] Roberts resubmitted the story in the mid-1980s to script editor Eric Saward,[12] but nothing came of the submission.[12]

[edit] The Secret of CassiusEdit

Written by Andrew Smith, this story was rejected by Read in August 1978.[92]

[edit] The Tearing of the VeilEdit

Written by Alan Drury, the scripts were commissioned on 2 April 1979[89] for this four-part story.[63] The story was set in the Victorian era[63] and the entire action would take place in and around a vicarage.[63] The vicar had recently dies and fake spiritualists were exploiting the widow.[63] The first episode would open with a seance during which the TARDIS would arrive.[63] On 19 September 1979,[93] the story was accepted subject to alterations.[93]

[edit] Valley of the LostEdit

Written by Philip Hinchcliffe, this story involved the Doctor and Romana encountering an alien Luron called Godrin who crash landed in a South American jungle in 1870.[94] Adams wrote to Hinchcliffe on 3 January 1979,[86] explaining that the proposed script would be too costly to produce.[86] It was later adapted as The Valley of Death by Jonathan Morris for Big Finish's The Lost Stories series in January 2012.

[edit] "Untitled storyline (Adams)"Edit

Written by Douglas Adams,[90] this story would involve the Doctor going into retirement but being constantly called upon to solve various problems.[5] It was considered as the final story of Series 17[5] till Williams dismissed the idea.[5] It was replaced by Shada.[5]

[edit] "Untitled storyline (Mills & Wagner)"Edit

Written by Pat Mills & John Wagner,[95] this story was submitted around the start of 1979.[5] The story would involve a parallel universe in which the Roman Empire never fell.[5] Mills & Wagner subsequently adapted it to become the comic story The Iron Legion for Doctor Who Weekly in late 1979.[5]

[edit] Submitted for series 18Edit

[edit] The Castle of DoomEdit

Written by David Fisher, this story was submitted by Fisher on 7 November 1979.[12]

[edit] The Dogs of DarknessEdit

Written by Jack Gardner, a scene breakdown for this four-part story[12] was commissioned on 29 March 1980[96] and the scripts on 11 August 1980.[96] It was still under consideration in April 1981.[12]

[edit] Farer NohanEdit

Written by Andrew Stephenson, a scene breakdown for this four-part story[12] was commissioned on 18 March 1980.[97]

[edit] Into the CometEdit

Written by James Follett, this involved an alien race living inside a comet.[93]

[edit] Invasion of the VeridiansEdit

Written by Nabil Shaban, this story was submitted to the production office in 1980.[1]

[edit] Mark of LumosEdit

Written by Keith Miles, a story outline for this four-part story[50] was commissioned on 14 March 1980.[97]

[edit] Mouth of GrathEdit

Written by Malcolm Edwards & Leroy Kettle, a scene breakdown for this four-part story[50] was commissioned on 18 March 1980.[97]

[edit] The PsychonautsEdit

Written by David Fisher,[96] this story was discussed with Adams in late 1979.[50] It would have featured the Doctor battling the Nephilim, creatures who travel through time in sleeping units that look like sarcophagi.[50] New producer Nathan-Turner was not interested[50] and instead The Leisure Hive was developed.[50]

[edit] RomanoidsEdit

Written by Geoff Lowe, this spec outline arrived at the production office in the summer of 1980.[17] It was passed on to Nathan-Turner on 9 December 1980.[95]

[edit] Sealed OrdersEdit

Written by Christopher Priest, a scene breakdown for this four-part story[17] was commissioned on 27 February 1980[97] and the full scripts on 24 March 1981.[98] The story was set on Gallifrey[17] and would involve the Doctor being ordered to kill Romana.[17]

[edit] Soldar and the PlastoidsEdit

Written by John Bennett, a scene breakdown for this four-part story[17] was commissioned on 10 April 1980.[96]

[edit] Song of the Space WhaleEdit

Space-Whale[99] was originally pitched by Pat Mills and his writing partner John Wagner in 1980 as a Fourth Doctor adventure.[100] When the production office showed some signs of interest, Wagner left the project[100] and the script was commissioned as a four-part Fifth Doctor story for a scene breakdown on 7 September 1981[99] and full scripts on 2 December 1981.[99] The new drafts reduced the humor[100] and the renamed Song of the Space Whale[99] was now planned as the third series of Series 20 and intended to introduce new companion Vislor Turlough.[100] The story concerned a group of people living in the belly of a giant whale in space.[101] The Doctor would find this out while attempting to protect the creature from being slaughtered by a rusting factory ship.[101] The castaways living in the whale, as well as the ship's captain, would be working class characters,[100] with the former's dialogue being based on that of a working-class Northern Irish family that Mills knew.[100] During the writing, Mills and script editor Eric Saward "fundamentally disagreed" on the character of the captain (Saward wanting a more Star Trek-type figure) and the dialogue for the castaways. Mills has said that "there was a Coronation Street quality to it that Eric felt didn't work in space. He thought the future would be classless, and I didn't."[102] Mills' disagreements with Saward led to the script being delayed until it was too late to serve as Turlough's introductory story.[67] The script was then considered for Series 21 and later still Series 22.[67] By this point the script had been revised as two 45-minute episodes,[67] but although it was still listed in July 1985 as an ongoing script,[67] by November 1985 Nathan-Turner confirmed at a convention that the script had been dropped.[67] The "Space Whale" concept was eventually revised and realised in the 2010 episode The Beast Below. It was later adapted as The Song of Megaptera by Mills for Big Finish's The Lost Stories in May 2010.

[edit] "Untitled storyline (Brosnan)"Edit

Written by John Brosnan submitted this idea some time after Bidmead became script editor in January 1980.[5] The story would have involved the Doctor arriving at the BBC Television Centre and meeting Tom Baker.[5] The two would then pair up to combat a threat.[5]

[edit] Fifth DoctorEdit

[edit] Submitted for series 19Edit

[edit] The Enemy WithinEdit

Written by Christopher Priest, the opportunity to write this four-part story[103] was offered to Priest after his previous script, Sealed Orders, had been cancelled.[103] The scene breakdown was commissioned on 5 December 1980[104] and the scripts on 6 February 1981.[104] The story dealt with the 'secret' of what actually powered the TARDIS[103] and was designed to write out the character of Adric.[103] After hearing nothing from the production office with regard to his completed scripts or his payment for them, Priest made contact with John Nathan-Turner.[103] He was told that the scripts were unusable and that he would not be paid.[105] After a bitter dispute Priest was paid and both Nathan-Turner and Eric Saward forced to pen a letter of apology over their treatment of the writer.[105] The script was replaced by Saward's script Earthshock.

[edit] Genesis of the CybermenEdit

Written by Gerry Davis, this four-part story[1] was submitted on spec to the production office around February 1982.[106] It concerned the Doctor arriving on Mondas at a point in time when the Cybermen are being created.[106] This idea would be later explored in the Big Finish audio adventure Spare Parts by Marc Platt and released in July 2002. In turn Spare Parts was heavily borrowed from for the television episodes Rise of the Cybermen and The Age of Steel in 2006.

[edit] HebosEdit

Written by Rod Beacham, a scene breakdown for this four-part story[1] was commissioned on 5 December 1980.[104]

[edit] Project Zeta SigmaEdit

The Fifth Doctor's first story was originally intended to be the four-part Project Zeta Sigma, written by John Flanagan & Andrew McCulloch.[107] It was not intended to follow on directly from the events of Logopolis; instead, the Doctor and his companions would have already left Earth. The story was to concern nuclear disarmament.[108] Commissioned as Project '4G' on 7 October 1980,[107] the script proved unworkable, and producer John Nathan-Turner dropped the story on 19 February 1981.[109] He then commissioned recently departed script editor Christopher H. Bidmead to write a replacement which became Castrovalva. This last minute change disrupted the shooting schedule, meaning that Castrovalva would be the fourth serial of the series filmed, though it would be the first transmitted.[108]

[edit] The PsychronsEdit

Written by Terence Greer, a scene breakdown for this four-part story[50] was commissioned on 13 June 1980.[104]

[edit] The Torson TriumvirateEdit

Written by Andrew Smith, a scene breakdown for this four-part story [17] set on present-day Earth[17] was commissioned on 25 November 1980.[104] The story was still under consideration in April 1981.[17]

[edit] Submitted for series 20Edit

[edit] ParasitesEdit

Written by Bill Lyons and also known as The Parasites, a scene breakdown was commissioned on 22 September 1981,[99] with the scripts commissioned on 16 February & 23 April 1982[99] by which point it was being considered for series 21.[110]

[edit] Way Down YonderEdit

Written by Lesley Elizabeth Thomas, a scene breakdown for this four-part story[17] was commissioned on 23 April 1981.[99] The story was abandoned at some point after November 1981.[17]

[edit] "Untitled storyline (Lee)"Edit

Written by Tanith Lee, the scripts for this four-part story were commissioned on 6 February 1981.[99]

[edit] Submitted for 20th anniversary specialEdit

[edit] The Six DoctorsEdit

Written by Robert Holmes,[111] this story was planned as the 20th anniversary special.[17] The 90 minute single-part story[17] was commissioned on 2 August 1982[17] and would involve the various Doctors and companions drawn to the planet Maladoom[17] where they are trapped by the Master who is working for the Cybermen.[17] The Cybermen want to isolate the genetic material that permits Time Lords to time travel freely so that they can incorporate that information into their own biology.[17] Holmes made little headway with the script and withdrew from the project on 13 October 1982.[17] Holmes would later use part of the storyline in The Two Doctors.[17]

[edit] Submitted for series 21Edit

[edit] Children of SethEdit

After completing Snakedance, Saward requested that writer Christopher Bailey devise another story.[50] The initial outline for May Time was commissioned on 24 August 1982[112] and was about the Doctor and his companions arriving at the court of Byzantium.[50] Full scripts were commissioned on 16 September 1982 with the new title Man-watch,[112] but the scripts were dropped from production for unclear reasons. A second attempt at the story under the title Children of Seth was attempted as a Sixth Doctor story, for which the scripts commissioned on 14 July 1983.[112] This failed because of Bailey's failure to devise a structure for the new doctor's new 45 minute episode format and a tangible villan for the Doctor to face.[50] It was later adapted as The Children of Seth by Marc Platt for Big Finish's The Lost Stories in December 2011. This version reverts to the TARDIS crew of the Fifth Doctor, Tegan and Nyssa.[113]

[edit] Circus of DestinyEdit

Written by Ben Steed, this two-part story was delivered in January 1983.[114]

[edit] The DarknessEdit

Eric Pringle submitted this storyline for a four-part story[12] to the production office in August 1981.[112]

[edit] The Dark SamuraiEdit

Written by Andrew Smith, this story was submitted to the production office around 1983[12] and was to have been set in early Nineteenth century Japan.[12]

[edit] The EliteEdit

Written by Barbara Clegg this was submitted in late 1982.[114] It dealt with a race of intelligent youths controlled by a lone Dalek.[114] It was later adapted by John Dorney for Big Finish's The Lost Stories in October 2011.

[edit] Ghost PlanetEdit

Written by Robin Squire, a scene breakdown commissioned on 5 January 1983[112] and the scripts on 20 May 1983.[112]

[edit] HexEdit

Written by Peter Ling & Hazel Adair, this story developed out of plans by producer Nathan-Turner to create a sequel to 1960s soap opera Compact, entitled Impact.[115] When, after drafting three or four scripts for the proposed Impact, Nathan-Turner informed the pair that plans for the soap had been cancelled, the producer offered them the opportunity to write for Doctor Who as a form of compensation.[115] A scene breakdown (whittled down from six parts to four)[116] was commissioned on 12 July 1983,[117] but after three months of development on the scripts,[115] during which the story was restructured into two 45-minute episodes,[115] it was ultimately rejected.[115] The plot involves the disappearance of various people on Earth,[118] which leads the Doctor and Peri to the planet Hexagora[118] where the Doctor becomes romantically involved with Queen Zafia[119] who is trying to save the insect race of Hexagora from destruction[118] through a plan to infiltrate and take over Earth.[119] It was later adapted as Hexagora by Paul Finch for Big Finish's The Lost Stories in November 2011.

[edit] The House That Ur-Cjak BuiltEdit

Written by Andrew Stephenson,[112] a scene breakdown was commissioned on 10 June 1982.[112]

[edit] The MetrakiEdit

Written by Andrew Smith, this story was submitted to the production office around 1983.[50] This storyline led to Smith being commissioned for The First Sontarans.[50]

[edit] Nightmare CountryEdit

Written by Stephen Gallagher,[120] this script was submitted in late 1982[114] but rejected by Saward on grounds of cost.[114] The four-part story[50] would involve the Doctor, Tegan and Turlough testing a Reality Simulator.[50] This simulator projects a graveyard world overrun by the Vodyani[50] who soon find a way out of the virtual reality and into the real world.[50]

[edit] The Place Where All Times MeetEdit

Written by Colin Davis, a scene breakdown was commissioned on 10 June 1982.[112]

[edit] PoisonEdit

Written by Rod Beacham, a screen breakdown was commissioned on 27 April 1982[112] and the scripts on 27 May 1982.[112]

[edit] The Rogue TARDISEdit

Written by Barbara Clegg, this story was submitted in late 1982[114] and dealt with the Doctor searching for a missing Time Lord who has regenerated to merge with his TARDIS.[114]

[edit] The SCIEdit

Written by William Emms, this four-part storyline[50] was discussed but not commissioned[112] when Emms approached the production office in 1983.[50] The story involved the populace of the planet Alden falling under mental domination.[50]

[edit] The UnderworldEdit

Written by Barbara Clegg, this story was submitted in late 1982[114] and saw the Doctor travel down the River Styx in Ancient Greece[114] where he would discover an alien race, the Hadeans,[17] kidnapping the women of Greece due to their own race being rendered infertile.[17]

[edit] WarmongersEdit

Written by Marc Platt and Charles M. Stevens (a pseudonym for J. Jeremy Bentham), this story was submitted on spec in 1983[114] and was discussed with Saward but not commissioned.[112] This story dealt with Sontarans and Rutans in England during the 1940s blitz.[114]

[edit] The ZeldanEdit

Written by William Emms, this four-part storyline[17] was discussed but not commissioned[112] when Emms approached the production office in 1983.[50]

[edit] Sixth DoctorEdit

[edit] Submitted for series 22Edit

All scripts commissioned for this series were done so for the new 45 minute episode format.

[edit] Cat's CradleEdit

Written by Marc Platt,[121] this was submitted to Saward in 1984[122] and rejected for being too ambitious for Doctor Who's budget.[122] Platt later adapted the story as a novel for the Virgin New Adventures range in February 1992.

[edit] The First SontaransEdit

Written by Andrew Smith, a scene breakdown had been commissioned on 10 January 1984.[117] The two-part story[12] would have involved the Mary Celeste.[12] It was turned down due to the fact that the Sontarans were to appear in The Two Doctors.[123] It was later adapted by Smith for Big Finish as part of their The Lost Stories series in July 2012.

[edit] The Guardians of ProphecyEdit

Written by Johnny Byrne, a plot outline for this story, also known as The Place of Serenity, was submitted to the production office by Byrne in July 1983.[117] The two-part story[1] would have seen the Doctor visit the planet Serenity, which is part of the same union that Traken belonged to.[1] The rulers of Serenity are assisted by a computer known as Prophecy[1] and the villains of the piece, Auga and Mura,[1] are attempting to overthrow the rulers.[1] It was later adapted by Jonathan Morris for Big Finish as part of their The Lost Stories series in May 2012.

[edit] LeviathanEdit

Written by Brian Finch. The scripts for the two-part story[124] were commissioned as Livanthian on 14 August 1983.[117] It was later adapted by Paul Finch (Brian's son) for Big Finish as part of their The Lost Stories series in January 2010.

[edit] The MacrosEdit

Written by Ingrid Pitt & Tony Rudlin was conceived of as a four-part Fifth Doctor story[50] during the production of Series 21[50] before being quickly revised as a two-part Sixth Doctor tale.[50] A script for the first episode only was commissioned as The Macro Men on 19 January 1984.[117] It was later adapted by Pitt & Rudlin for Big Finish as part of their The Lost Stories series in June 2010.

[edit] VolvokEdit

Written by Ian Marter, the script for episode one only had been commissioned as Strange Encounter on 2 February 1984.[117] The two-part story[17] is thought to have dealt with the theme of hospital overcrowding.[117]

[edit] "Untitled storyline (Bidmead)"Edit

Written by Christopher H. Bidmead, a scene breakdown was commissioned on 19 June 1984.[123]

[edit] "Untitled storyline (Boucher)"Edit

Written by Chris Boucher, a scene breakdown was commissioned on 7 February 1984.[117]

[edit] The originally planned series 23Edit

When Doctor Who was put on hiatus in February 1985, several completed scripts were already being prepared for the 1986 series (which would retain the format of thirteen 45 minute episodes). Others tales were still in the story-outline stage. All of these scripts were later abandoned to make way for The Trial of a Time Lord, when the series resumed in September 1986.

[edit] The Nightmare FairEdit

Main article: The Nightmare FairWritten by Graham Williams, this two-part story[125] was commissioned on 25 September 1984 as Arcade[125] and was planned to open the original 23rd series.[126] Nathan-Turner hoped to have Matthew Robinson direct the adventure.[127] Williams wrote a novelisation of the script which was published by Target Books in May 1989. It was later adapted by John Ainsworth for Big Finish as part of their The Lost Stories series in November 2009.

[edit] The Ultimate EvilEdit

Main article: The Ultimate EvilWritten by Wally K. Daly, this two-part story was planned to be the second story in the original 23rd series.[126] Nathan-Turner hoped to have Fiona Cumming direct the adventure.[127] Daly wrote a novelization of the script which was published by Target Books in August 1989.

[edit] Mission to MagnusEdit

Main article: Mission to MagnusWritten by Philip Martin, this two-part story was planned to be the third story in the original 23rd series.[128] Nathan-Turner hoped to have Ron Jones direct the adventure.[127] Martin wrote a novelization of the script which was published by Target Books in July 1990. It was later adapted by Martin for Big Finish as part of their The Lost Stories series in December 2009.

[edit] Yellow Fever and How to Cure ItEdit

Yellow Fever and How to Cure It was a three-part story by Robert Holmes that would have taken place in Singapore and featured the Autons as the monsters, with both the Rani, the Master appearing.[128] The first episode was commissioned on 26 October 1984, before being put on hold.[128] The entire story was subsequently commissioned on 6 February 1986,[128] only a couple of weeks before news of the planned hiatus broke. Nathan-Turner hoped to have Graeme Harper direct the adventure.[127] After the news of the hiatus, Holmes was asked by the production team to continue with the story but as six 25 minute episodes,[128] this version seeing the removal of the Master from the plot.[129] Holmes reportedly only completed a story outline before the planned Series 23 was completely canceled.[130]

[edit] In the Hollows of TimeEdit

Commissioned as a two-part story from Christopher H. Bidmead on 21 November 1984.[128] After the news of the hiatus, Bidmead was asked by the production team to continue with the story but as four 25 minute episodes.[128] It was later adapted as The Hollows of Time by Bidmead for Big Finish as part of their The Lost Stories series in June 2010.

[edit] The Children of JanuaryEdit

Written by Michael Feeney Callan, this story was commissioned on 5 February 1985.[125] After the news of the hiatus, Callan was asked by the production team to continue with the story but as four 25 minute episodes.[128] It had been planned that an adaptation of this story would appear as part of Big Finish's The Lost Stories range, but fell through due to the author's other commitments and was replaced by The Macros.[131]

[edit] Also submitted for original series 23Edit

[edit] Dark LabyrinthEdit

Written by David Banks, the story was rejected by Saward for being too costly to realise.[12]

[edit] DoomwraithsEdit

Written by Philip Martin, this story was submitted on 28 December 1983[124] and dealt with an alien race returning to Earth to discover their "humanity" experiment has failed.[114] On 9 March 1984,[12] Saward noted that the story idea would need further development before he could assess it for commissioning.[12]

[edit] FlipbackEdit

Written by David Banks.[132]

[edit] GallifreyEdit

Gallifrey was a Pip & Jane Baker script for four 25-minute episodes[133] that was commissioned on 11 March 1985[128] in the wake of the hiatus announcement, that reportedly would have dealt with the destruction of the Doctor's aforementioned home planet.[128] The concept of Gallifrey's destruction was briefly revived for the proposed interregnum feature film version of Doctor Who (see "Proposed films" below) before being incorporated into the Doctor's backstory beginning in the 2005 series.

[edit] IcebergEdit

Written by David Banks,[1] the writer proposed the story around the time that he was engaged to play the Cyberleader in Attack of the Cybermen.[1] Banks later adapted the story as a novel for the Virgin New Adventures range in September 1993.

[edit] League of the TancredsEdit

Written by Peter Grimwade, this two-part story[1] was commissioned on 13 August 1984[123] and abandoned on 8 November 1984[125] after the completion of a scene breakdown.[128]

[edit] MeltdownEdit

Written by Gary Hopkins,[133] this story reunites the Doctor with his former companion, Victoria Waterfield, now crusading against nuclear waste. It was later adapted as Power Play by Hopkins for Big Finish's The Lost Stories range in June 2012.

[edit] Point of EntryEdit

Written by Barbara Clegg, this storyline involved the Doctor and Peri in Elizabethan London as an alien race, the Omnim, return via an Aztec knife.[133] It was also to feature Christopher Marlowe.[133] It was later adapted by Marc Platt for Big Finish as part of their The Lost Stories series in April 2010.

[edit] Space SargassoEdit

Written by Philip Martin, this story was submitted on 28 December 1983[124] and had the TARDIS pulled to a spaceship graveyard controlled by the Master.[114] On 9 March 1984[17] Saward felt that the story idea needed further work before it could be considered for commissioning.[17]

[edit] Valley of ShadowsEdit

Written by Philip Martin, this story was submitted on 28 December 1983[124] and had the Doctor travel into the Egyptian underworld to save Peri.[114] On 9 March 1984[17] Saward felt that the story idea needed further work before it could be considered for commissioning.[17]

[edit] "Untitled storyline (Pritchard)"Edit

Written by Bill Pritchard.[133]

[edit] "Untitled storyline (Wolfman)"Edit

Written by Jonathan Wolfman.[133]

[edit] The Trial of a Time Lord candidatesEdit

After the decision was taken to cancel all the stories previously commissioned for series 23, new stories were sought for the shortened 14 episode series. The plan was for three production blocks, divided up into two four-episode lots and one block of six episodes. Robert Holmes was assigned the opening four-part story and Philip Martin the second four-part story. The final six episodes were to be broken up into three two-part stories.

[edit] Attack from the MindEdit

Writer David Halliwell[134] was approached by Eric Saward in early July 1985 as a prospective writer for the "new" series 23.[135] Halliwell submitted his untitled first draft of the then untitled two-part story[136] to the production office in late July 1985.[135] The story dealt with a conflict between the ugly looking Freds and the beautiful Penelopeans.[135] Work on a second draft began on 14 August 1985[136] and was completed by 22 August 1985,[136] with a third draft submitted on 11 September 1985.[136] Saward spent much time with Halliwell on further drafts, changing the name of the Freds to Trikes.[136] The fourth revision was delivered on 26 September 1985[137] and 7 October 1985 saw a fifth draft arrive at the production office.[137] Halliwell received a letter from Saward on 18 October 1985, advising him that Attack from the Mind had been cancelled.[137]

[edit] The Second Coming[citation needed]Edit

Jack Trevor Story[138] was invited to the same series briefing as Halliwell,[135] and this two-part story[136] was meant to share sets with Attack from the Mind[136] as well as being linked narratively.[136]

With the dismissal of Halliwell and Story's scripts, Saward looked to replace them with a single four-part adventure.

[edit] PinacothecaEdit

Written by Christopher H. Bidmead, the story was commissioned on 29 October 1985 as The Last Adventure,[139] with second draft scripts of all four episodes delivered by 9 January 1986.[139] The story was dropped on 7 February 1986.[139]

[edit] Paradise FiveEdit

Written by P.J. Hammond, the story was commissioned as End of Term on 10 February 1986[139] as a replacement for Pinacotheca. It involved the Doctor investigating the resort of Paradise Five, while Mel goes undercover as a hostess.[140] When this script too failed, it was replaced in turn by Pip & Jane Baker's Terror of the Vervoids. It was later adapted as Paradise 5 by Andy Lane for Big Finish as part of their The Lost Stories series in March 2010.

[edit] Time IncEdit

Time Inc was the title for the concluding two-part story-arc as to have originally been written by Robert Holmes when commissioned on 4 February 1986.[141] However, Holmes was unable to work on the script past the first part due to his untimely death on 24 May 1986.[141] Script editor Eric Saward was tasked with completing the story, his version of the script ending with the Doctor and the Valeyard locked in battle in the time vortex and no clear victor. This was disapproved by series producer John Nathan-Turner as being too down-beat and would end the show on an inconclusive moment should the BBC decide to cancel the series.[138] The final episode was subsequently commissioned from Pip & Jane Baker by Nathan-Turner after Saward quit as script editor following the rejection of his proposed ending.

[edit] Mel introduction storyEdit

According to his book Doctor Who: The Companions (published at about the time The Trial of a Time Lord was broadcast), series producer John Nathan-Turner intended to chronicle the Doctor's first meeting with Melanie Bush in a later episode.[142] The subsequent dismissal of Colin Baker from the role of the Doctor rendered this potential storyline moot, although the later novel Business Unusual by Gary Russell, that was published in September 1997, would attempt to fill in this gap in the show's continuity.[143]

[edit] Seventh DoctorEdit

[edit] Submitted for series 26Edit

[edit] AlixionEdit

Written by Robin Mukherjee, this three-part story[105] had been considered for series 26 as the "spare" script[144] should another planned story become no longer suitable. The adventure was to take place on monastic planet[144] inhabited by humans and large beetles.[105] The humans were monks who worked to provide a special elixir that enhanced intelligence.[105] This elixir would be produced by the beetles are feeding on intelligent beings and the abbot of the monastery wants to feed the doctor to the beetles in order to produce a more potent elixir for himself.[105] The script was not completed beyond a partial storyline,[105] Mukherjee unsure how events would have been resolved beyond a contest of wills between the Doctor and the abbot.[105]

[edit] AvatarEdit

Written by David A. McIntee, this was a four-part[145] Lovecraftian horror story[121] set in Arkham, New England[145] in 1927,[121] although McIntee later began a rewrite to shift the action to Cornwall.[145] The story was based around alien bodysnatchers who could only inhabit the bodies of the dead.[145] The villain of the piece would discover the remains of a Silurian god and try and clone itself a new body from the fossilized body.[145]

[edit] Illegal AlienEdit

Written by Mike Tucker & Robert Perry, this was a three-part Cybermen story set in war-torn London of the 1940s.[144] They had completed the first two episodes in script form and the final episode as a storyline, and were planning to submit it during the start of production on series 26.[144] Fellow writer Ben Aaronovitch intercepted the script, suggesting that submitting to script editor Andrew Cartmel a World War II script when he was currently already editing something similar (The Curse of Fenric) was a mistake and to instead submit it for the following series.[144] Tucker & Perry later adapted the story as a novel for the BBC Past Doctors range in October 1997.

[edit] LungbarrowEdit

Written by Marc Platt.[121] Platt later adapted the story as a novel for the Virgin New Adventures range in March 1997.

[edit] ShrineEdit

In 1988[146] writer Marc Platt discussed with script editor Andrew Cartmel an idea inspired by Leo Tolstoy's War and Peace,[122] concerning stone-headed aliens[121] looking for their God-King[122] in Tsarist 19th Century Russia.[146]

[edit] Under consideration for series 27Edit

Before the original Doctor Who series reached its conclusion, some tentative plans had been made for a proposed 27th series under the assumption that it would maintain the then-current pattern of two four-part and two three-part stories. As noted in each entry, Big Finish Productions has produced audio adaptations of several scripts as part of their The Lost Stories releases. The safecracking companion introduced in Crime of the Century (see below), who was never named during the planning, has now been given a name, that of Raine Creevey, and she is portrayed by Beth Chalmers.[147]

[edit] Earth AidEdit

The opening three-part, studio-bound story[148] was to be by Ben Aaronovitch; a space opera featuring a race of samurai insect-like aliens called the Metatraxi.[149] Earth Aid was to open with Ace in the captain's chair of a starship,[149] and the story would concern the politics of humanitarian aid.[149] The Metatraxi were originally conceived as part of a stage play entitled War World.[149] The Metatraxi were later used in Lawrence Miles' spin-off novel Alien Bodies.[150] Earth Aid (a title invented by Dave Owen for his "27 up" article in DWM[151]) was later adapted by Aaronovitch and Cartmel for Big Finish's The Lost Stories range in July 2011. Cartmel is on record as preferring the title Bad Destination.[152]

[edit] Thin IceEdit

This four-parter, the second story of the proposed series,[151] was to have been written by Marc Platt and was due to feature Ice Warriors in a London of 1968.[153] It would have seen the departure of Ace[151] to the Prydonian Academy to become a Time Lord.[153][154] The story was to introduce a character with underworld connections who was intended to become a recurring character similar to the Brigadier.[151] The character would have a daughter born at the conclusion of the adventure who would be named by the Doctor.[153] The plot would have featured an Ice Warrior's armour in the London Dungeon[151] and two reincarnated Warriors continuing a long rivalry.[151] Platt also intended to have bikers being controlled by the Ice Warriors (and wearing similar helmets), scenes on a terraformed pastoral Mars, and a more mystical bent to the aliens while deepening their history.[155] Marc Platt has revealed that the name Ice Time was "only ever invented for an article in Doctor Who Magazine" (Dave Owen's "27 up" article).[156] It was later adapted by Platt for Big Finish's The Lost Stories range in April 2011.

[edit] Crime of the CenturyEdit

Was to have been written by Andrew Cartmel, and would have introduced a cat burglar/safecracker as the next companion.[153] The character with underworld connections from Thin Ice would be featured as an older individual and the father of the new companion.[153] Crime of the Century (another title invented by Owen for "27 up") was later adapted by Cartmel for Big Finish's The Lost Stories range in May 2011. Cartmel would have preferred to call the story Action at a Distance.[152]

[edit] AnimalEdit

Cartmel had wanted to pen a story of his own.[144] Animal (another title invented by Owen for "27 up") was later adapted by Cartmel for Big Finish's The Lost Stories range in June 2011. Cartmel would have preferred to call the story Blood and Iron.[152]

[edit] HostageEdit

Written by Neil Penswick, this was a three-part[157] futuristic thriller in which a group of soldiers are hunting down two shape-changing criminals called Butler and Swarfe.[157] The cliffhanger to part one had Swarfe changing into a monster who then went on the hunt in part two.[157] Penswick later adapted some material from this for his Virgin New Adventures novel The Pit in March 1993.

[edit] Night ThoughtsEdit

Written by Edward Young, this is a horror story set in an isolated house.[144] It would feature a group of university staff, one who was a cripple, trapped in the house during winter.[144] One of the characters would turn out to be a murderer.[144] The story took its name and theme from the poem Night-Thoughts by Edward Young, namesake of the story's writer. It was later adapted by Young for Big Finish in February 2006. The adaptation featured the Seventh Doctor and Ace, as well as Big Finish-original companion Hex.

[edit] A School for GloryEdit

Written by Tony Etchells & an unidentified writer, this was to be set during the Great War.[145] The narrative was planned to alternate between the trenches and a British country house doubling as an army academy.[145]

[edit] Submitted for 30th anniversary specialEdit

[edit] Lost in the Dark DimensionEdit

The first time the idea of a special video-only anniversary special was mooted was in a memo Nathan-Turner wrote to Head of Video Production Penny Mills on 18 February 1992.[158] With Tom Baker not adverse to appearing should conditions be met,[159] serious thought was given to an original production.[159] June 1992 saw a meeting to discuss the concept of the special[160] and by 21 July 1992[160] writer Adrian Rigelsford (later joined by Joanna McCaul) had completed an initial outline for the story entitled Timeflyers.[160] Shortly afterwards the project was given the cover name The Environment Roadshow.[160] A production office was opened for the project in the first week of September 1992[161] with shooting planned for January–February 1993.[161] The script was sent to Peter Cregeen on 22 March 1993,[162] indicating at the same time that Graeme Harper was being looked at as a potential director for the special.[163] However issues with budgets continued to plague the production[162] and shooting slipped to taking place November–December 1994[163] with a final delivery date of 14 March 1994.[163] Around mid-May Cregeen indicated that he'd like to see the special broadcast on the BBC in November 1993.[164] By the end of May 1993 the project was now being referred to as The Dark Dimension[164] before a new working title of Lost in the Dark Dimension was settled on.[164] Harper was contracted as the director of the special in June 1993[165] and intended Rik Mayall to play the part of the villain, Hawkspur.[165] What was hoped to be the final shooting script was completed on 21 June 1993[166] and with the production now aimed for broadcast than a direct-to-video release,[167] Alan Yentob gave the special the green light[166] with the plan to have the completed project delivered by 27 November 1993.[166] By the start of July 1993[168] budget issues continued to plague the production[168] and on 9 July 1993 the project was officially cancelled.[169] With the project sunk, the 30th anniversary was instead celebrated with the light-hearted charity special Dimensions in Time and the documentary 30 Years in the TARDIS. The BBC press release hinted at the plot with the following: The future? The Earth is dying under the onslaught of industry, the polar caps are melting, the ozone layer is nearly destroyed... To save the planet, the Doctor must overcome the combined forces of some of the most feared of his old adversaries. But he must also confront a far greater enemy - one that has already reverted him to his Fourth Incarnation - in order to save both the past and future Doctors before they are taken out of time and cease to exist.[170]

[edit] Eighth DoctorEdit

[edit] 1990s US reboot - Leekley bibleEdit

Early in the process that was to lead to the 1996 Doctor Who film, Universal Television had Amblin Entertainment produce a writers' bible which detailed John Leekley's proposed pilot and episodes of a new series.[171] The new series would have established a new continuity rather than following on from the classic series,[171] and the bible reused many elements from the classic series. It is unclear whether clearance could have been obtained for all the episodes detailed, as the costs would likely have fallen to the BBC.[171]

The pilot was to feature the half-human Doctor seeking his father, Ulysses, through various time periods—contemporary Gallifrey (where Borusa dies and is merged with the TARDIS, and the Master becomes leader of the Time Lords), England during the Blitz, Ancient Egypt, and Skaro (where the Daleks are being created).[172] Other proposed episodes in the bible included The Pirates, in which the Doctor teamed up with Blackbeard,[173] and several remakes of stories from the classic series, including:

Earlier versions of the bible included, among others:

Leekley's scripts were not well received at Amblin or elsewhere; and in September 1994, he was removed from the project.[178]

[edit] Ninth DoctorEdit

[edit] "Untitled storyline (Abbott)"Edit

Written by Paul Abbott, this episode was intended for episode 11 of Series 1.[179] With Jack Harkness having joined the Ninth Doctor and Rose Tyler, Rose feels left out.[citation needed] But when they land in Pompeii in 79 AD,[citation needed] Jack discovers that Rose's life has been manipulated by the Doctor in an experiment to create the perfect companion.[179] Abbot's commitment to Shameless and other projects led to him dropping out of the episode.[179] Russell T Davies took over and wrote "Boom Town" in its place.[179]

[edit] Tenth DoctorEdit

For Series 2 of 2006, an untitled episode 2 set at Buckingham Palace, concerned Queen Victoria getting an alien insect in her eye.[citation needed] The setting was eventually changed to the Torchwood Estate and the alien being changed to a werewolf. For the same series, episode 11 involved a villain who has discovered how to drain things of their beauty, and has reduced his planet to a sterile grey landscape.[citation needed]

[edit] "Untitled 1920s storyline"Edit

The revived Doctor Who series was to feature a script by Stephen Fry, set in the 1920s. Rumours appeared on the BBC's websites shortly after the airing of the new Series 1[180] and the story was pencilled in as the tenth episode of Series 2.[50] According to a video diary entry by David Tennant, Fry attended the very first cast read-through for Series 2, indicating that his script was still under consideration at that point.[181] Due to budgetary constraints, the episode was moved to Series 3 and replaced by Fear Her. The story was subsequently abandoned, as Fry did not have spare time[182] for the rewriting necessary to replace Rose with Martha.[50] Fry said, "They asked me to do a series and I tried, but I just ran out of time, and so I wrote a pathetic letter of "I'm sorry I can't do this" to Davies."[183]

[edit] Century HouseEdit

A "companion-lite" episode, Century House was written by Tom MacRae for Series 3 of the revised show.[12] The Doctor was to appear on a live broadcast of Most Haunted, investigating a house haunted by the "Red Widow", with Martha Jones watching at home as a framing device. The episode did not fit into the production schedule, and was reworked such that the show was watched by Donna Noble and her mother Sylvia. Due to dissatisfaction with the premise, and to avoid two comedic episodes in the same series, the episode was dropped and replaced with Davies' Midnight.[12]

[edit] The Suicide ExhibitionEdit

During the Second World War, a Nazi task force assaults the Natural History Museum in London, which has been overrun by monsters. Later action would have involved the discovery of a secret chamber beneath the museum.[citation needed] This episode was written by Mark Gatiss and planned to air in the fourth series of Doctor Who, but was replaced by The Fires of Pompeii.[citation needed] Elements of the story were later reused in Steven Moffat's The Big Bang, the finale of Series 5.

[edit] "Untitled 2008 Christmas special"Edit

On Christmas Eve, an alien creature attaches itself to author J.K. Rowling. Suddenly, the real world is replaced by a magical reality influenced by the writer's own imagination. The Doctor must battle witches and wizards to reach Rowling and put the world to rights. David Tennant said that a Harry Potter spoof was too unprofesssional for Doctor Who and refused to act in it . Instead The Next Doctor was made . The Next Doctor conntained elements of the Harry Potter crossover .[184]

[edit] A Midwinter's TaleEdit

A grandmother is trapped in a posh hotel with her unruly family. Wishing that they'd all just disappear, she storms out of their suite to fetch some ice, only to find the corridors deserted. Returning to her rooms, she discovers that her family has indeed disappeared—but so has all of humanity. Finally, she comes upon the TARDIS and the Doctor. Investigating, they discover eight-legged centaur-like creatures abroad in London. It transpires that aliens from another dimension, the Shi'ar, have frozen time on Earth in order to hold a festival celebrating the marriage of their queen. The life of the grandmother's family becomes endangered, culminating in a race through secret tunnels beneath Buckingham Palace.[citation needed]

[edit] Television spin-offsEdit

During its run, several Doctor Who spin-offs have been proposed, including one featuring Professor George Litefoot and Henry Gordon Jago from The Talons of Weng Chiang,[185] and a children's show featuring "Young Doctor Who" which was vetoed by Russell T Davies and replaced by The Sarah Jane Adventures.[186] The following is the remainder of the proposed but eventually cancelled spin-off productions of the series:

[edit] The DaleksEdit

On 1 November 1966,[30] Dalek creator Terry Nation pitched a spin-off series The Daleks[30] to the BBC, writing a 30-minute teleplay entitled The Destroyers[30] as a possible pilot episode for an American co-production.[30] The Daleks was to have focused on the adventures of the SSS.[30] Lead characters included agents Captain Jack Corey, David Kingdom, his sister Sara Kingdom, and an android named Mark Seven.[30] On 22 November 1966,[29] the BBC informed Nation that they were no longer interested in the project.[29] It was later adapted by Nicholas Briggs & John Dorney for Big Finish's The Lost Stories range in December 2010.

[edit] "Nelvana cartoon series"Edit

[1][2]Concept art of the planned Doctor Who animated series by NelvanaIn the 1980s, a cartoon series was planned by Canadian animation house Nelvana[citation needed] which was to feature an unspecified Doctor incorporating elements of various BBC series Doctors.[citation needed] Concept art was prepared depicting several possible versions of the Doctor as well as K-9, an unnamed companion, Daleks, Cybermen and few new characters but the project did not proceed further and no pilot was produced.[187]

[edit] K-9 and CompanyEdit

Main article: K-9 and CompanyElisabeth Sladen was approached to return to Doctor Who as Sarah Jane Smith to help with the transition between Tom Baker and Peter Davison, but resisted the offer.[188] Following the outcry after K-9 was removed from the show, producer John Nathan-Turner proposed a spin-off featuring the two characters.[188] A single episode, "A Girl's Best Friend", was produced as a pilot for a proposed series, and broadcast by BBC1 as a Christmas special on 28 December 1981, but the series was not taken up. The basic premise of a series centered on Sarah Jane Smith was reused in the Sarah Jane Smith audio series and in The Sarah Jane Adventures just over 25 years later.

[edit] Rose Tyler: Earth DefenceEdit

When it was decided that Billie Piper would leave the series at the end of Series 2, executive producer and head writer Russell T Davies considered giving her character Rose Tyler her own 90-minute spin-off production, Rose Tyler: Earth Defence,[citation needed] with the possibility of such a special becoming an annual Bank Holiday event.[citation needed] The special would have picked up from Rose's departure in Doomsday in which Rose joins the Torchwood Institute of a parallel Earth.[citation needed] The special was officially commissioned by Peter Fincham, the Controller of BBC One, and assigned a production budget.[citation needed] Davies changed his mind while filming Piper's final scenes for Series 2 of Doctor Who, later calling Earth Defence "a spin-off too far"[citation needed] and deciding that for the audience to be able to see Rose when the Doctor could not would spoil the ending of Doomsday, and the production was cancelled.[citation needed] Davies said Piper had been told about the idea, but the project ended before she was formally approached about starring in it.[189] The plot element of Tyler working with Torchwood to defend the earth would be revisited towards the end of Series 4 in 2008.

[edit] Proposed filmsEdit

In the mid-1960s, two motion pictures starring Peter Cushing were produced based upon the television series. Since then, there have been periodic further attempts to adapt Doctor Who as a feature film.

[edit] Doctor Who Meets ScratchmanEdit

[3][4]An artist's impression of a poster for Doctor Who Meets Scratchman. Featured in Doctor Who Magazine #379, artwork by Brian WilliamsonDuring spare time in filming, Tom Baker and Ian Marter (who played Harry Sullivan in the series and later novelised several Doctor Who scripts for Target Books) wrote a script for a Doctor Who film, Doctor Who meets Scratchman. The script, sometimes titled Doctor Who and the Big Game,[190] saw the Doctor encounter the Daleks, meet the Devil known as Harry Scratch or Scratchman, robots known as Cybors, scarecrows made from bones, the Greek god Pan, and at times Vincent Price and Twiggy were associated with the production to play as the villain Harry Scratch and a possible new female companion after Elisabeth Sladen left the TV series.[191] The finale of the film was to have taken place on a giant pinball table, with the Doctor, Harry and Sarah dodging balls as well as battling Daleks on the board. During his tenure as the Fourth Doctor, Baker repeatedly tried to attract funding for the film. At one point, he received substantial donations from fans, but after taking legal advice was forced to return them. The plans were eventually dropped.[191]

[edit] Doctor Who and the KrikkitmenEdit

During the Fourth Doctor era, future Doctor Who script editor Douglas Adams submitted this story in 1976[1] before later preparing it as a submission for a Doctor Who film, Doctor Who and the Krikkitmen.[192] Elements of Krikkitmen were used in the Key to Time story arc, for which Adams wrote a story, and Krikkitmen was reworked as the third Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy book Life, the Universe and Everything.[192]

[edit] Lacuna film proposals (1987-1994)Edit

As the original Doctor Who series was nearing its end and continuing during the first interregnum (1989–1996), numerous attempts were made to adapt the series for the big screen for the first time since the Peter Cushing films of the 1960s. Jean-Marc Lofficier, in his book The Nth Doctor, profiles a number of film proposals, some of which came close to being produced. Ultimately, however, the only film version of Doctor Who (other than the two Cushing films) produced to date has been the 1996 made-for-TV film which was developed as a continuation of the TV series rather than a reboot or reimagining of the concept.[193] At one point, the film had the full working title, Doctor Who: The Last of the Time Lords. Among the script proposals profiled by Lofficier are several submissions by Space: 1999 alumnus Johnny Byrne, plus others by Robert DeLaurentis, Adrian Rigelsford, John Leekley, Mark Ezra and Denny Martin Flinn.[193]

[edit] Other related worksEdit

[edit] "Dr. Who radio series"Edit

During the late sixties, a radio series starring Peter Cushing as Dr. Who from the Dalek films had been planned to be produced. A collaboration between Stanmark Productions and Watermill Productions, a pilot had been recorded and a further 52 episodes were to be produced. The pilot story titled Journey into Time featured Doctor Who and his granddaughter travel to the time of the American Revolution. The script was written by future television series writer Malcolm Hulke and the recording remains lost.[194]

[edit] War WorldEdit

Proposed stage play written by Andrew Cartmel & Ben Aaronovitch.[citation needed]

[edit] See alsoEdit

[edit] ReferencesEdit

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Bailey, Shaun (Producer); Kalangis, Johnny (Director) (2004) (QuickTime or Windows Media). The Planet of the Doctor, Part 6: Doctor Who & Culture II (Documentary). Toronto: CBC Television. http://www.cbc.ca/planetofthedoctor/videos.html#. Retrieved 9 April 2009. "Planet of the Doctor". CBC Television. http://www.cbc.ca/planetofthedoctor/tb_gallery.html. Retrieved 9 April 2009. [dead link]

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  2. ^ BBC News 2006.
  3. ^ Bettoli-Lotten 2007.
  4. ^ a b Pixley 2006a.
  5. ^ a b Gaiman, Dickson & Simpson 2003.
  6. ^ a b Lofficier 1997.
  7. ^ Foster, Chuck (2012-01-15). "Missing Radio Script Discovered". Doctor Who News Page. http://www.doctorwhonews.net/2012/01/dwn150112121012-missing-radio-script.html.

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[edit] External linksEdit

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